?>

Finasteride 1mg Generic for Sale – Is It Worth It?

For a couple of men, seeing yourself in the morning with each one of your hairs suddenly disappearing is the most exceedingly appalling night horse ever. In case you think you are among the countless around the world who have persevered through not as much as perfect bareness on account of hazardous hormones then you can stop your burdens now since there are reasonable meds today that are shielded to use to restore back your full head of hair. The pharmaceutical finasteride 1mg generic for sale is so far at the most elevated need on the once-over of arrangements prescribed for men with male illustration hair scantiness. In case you think your latest revealed quest is troublesome for you, then it is time that you should consider acquiring finasteride 1mg generic for sale at your driving drugstores today.

Read more…

Tips on How to Buy Prednisone Online

Corticosteroid drugs like prednisone are helpful in alleviating inflammatory issues that not only causes discomfort, but also pain like that of rheumatoid arthritis.  Fortunately, through the use of prednisone, these can be alleviated as the drug is very effective in providing treatment relief over any form of inflamed swelling issues.  If you suffer from issues like rheumatoid arthritis, allergies, or asthma, you can buy prednisone online so you can use it any time an attack from any of these issues occur.  The best part in buying prednisone online is that you can save a lot of money as the prices of prednisone online are significantly cheaper than what you will find at your local pharmacy. Read more…

S.F. to Charge Market Rates for Parking

by Joshua Liberles on November 6, 2007

SFParking S.F. to Charge Market Rates for Parking

The goal in San Francisco is to decrease traffic congestion and the accompanying pollution. The solution: to charge a fluctuating market rate to keep metered space occupancy rates at 85%. That way, spaces are available for would-be parkers, which decreases the amount of circling for spots. This will do much to keep cars moving in and out of dense urban areas, generate significant additional revenues for the city, and encourage people to quit driving so damned much.

One of the keys to decreasing car usage, and the myriad of associated problems that automobiles bring us (pollution, global warming, health issues, expense, war to name a few) is to stop subsidizing the car. Relatively inexpensive gas (even at $3+ per gallon) and endless roads are clearly factors that make driving and car ownership more appealing; cheap parking is another.

Downtown parking spots are located on some prime real estate, and the meter rates don’t reflect the true worth of the space. Park(ing) Day brings attention to this inequity as groups temporarily reclaim parking spots and turn them into urban green space.

As we discussed in our Paradise Paved article, these spots carry hidden costs, which eventually filter back to consumers and taxpayers. So, why not just put the tariff up front on those who feel the need to drive into cities? Charge more for prime locations, and less to those willing to park away from city centers and walk into town, or to get on public transit.

In San Francisco, the prices on the electronic meters could easily be adjusted to match demand. A similar system is currently in place in Redwood City, CA where solar-powered meters are in operation. The result has been the desired turnover rate of parking spots, and increased revenue for the city.

According to Donald Shoup, a UCLA professor of urban planning, 85 percent occupancy is the magic number he refers to as the "Goldilocks Principle."

"If the price is set high, people won’t stay long; if it’s too low, people will never leave," Shoup said.

 

Via San Francisco Chronicle

Related posts:

  1. Video Indicts City Car Parking
  2. Parking Spaces: Measuring Blacktop Real Estate
  3. Parking Spots to Parks: Park(ing) Day
  4. L.A. Mayor’s Traffic Reduction Plan
  5. Bronx Neighborhood Chooses Parking over People
  6. Recent Posts

Leave a Comment

Previous post: Slowing Down City Life

Next post: Trains: The 200 Year Old Solution to Our Travel Problems